All posts filed under: Tunisia

what’s to eat #30

A simple, and simply delicious, Tunisian fricassee, prepared by the most charming of sandwich assemblers.  The fricassee is all about this special bread: a golden, fried roll, a bit spongy, but perfectly sturdy to house a festive mélange of Mediterranean delights: tuna, potatoes, egg, méchouia, olive oil, harissa, salt, an olive for some spunk. To enjoy at a slow stroll, in good company. Advertisements

what’s to eat #29

Fried pastries are a delicate matter, both literally and figuratively. people are particular, even passionate, about things like flake, crumb, and chew, and granulated versus powdered sugars. Families, cities, entire nations insist upon their unique patisserie, the best one, the only one, the right way. There’s no sense arguing; just keep chewing. I present to you the humble bombolouni of Sidi Bou Said, in Tunisia: Ragged edges, thick crunch, airy interior, served piping hot between pastry papers, tTo be eaten with gusto, and gratitude. [3esheq, Zied!] . . PS: If you like what you see here on Outernotes, please subscribe to receive posts to your inbox! Click “Follow these notes,” top right of the page!

on the artist

You’ve either got it, or you don’t. This guy’s got it. [Sidi Bou Said boutique, Tunisia. photo credit to Zied] . . . PS: If you like what you see here on Outernotes, please subscribe to receive posts to your inbox! Subscribe easily at the prompt on the right side bar of this page. If you’re a WordPresser, click “Follow these notes,” right side bar!

what’s to eat [and drink]

In Sidi Bou Said, outside Tunis, a restaurant that must resemble heaven, considering the grumpy service and tourist prices views. Next to a gaggle of children blowing bubbles and making faces, I enjoyed a strong, capable, robust mint tea topped with earthy pine nuts and a few aromatic leaves. And a hearty brik, hero of Tunisian street food: whisper-thin pastry dough stuffed with loose, runny egg and fried to perfection. sometimes also stuffed with tuna, or cheese, or potato, and often served with a wedge of lemon to squeeze over and balance the richness of the brik. May you enjoy your snacks – and your weekend! – with smiles, and fried perfection. . . . PS: If you like what you see here on Outernotes, please subscribe to receive posts to your inbox! Click “Follow these notes,” bottom of the page!

to market, to market

An advantage of visiting a place more than once is that you’re no longer hostage to its sensations, to its beauty. The second, third, tenth times around you might avoid being bowled over by the aromas and flavors, tingly with the aura of the landscape; this time, you’re likely have your wits about you, and that means you can make reasonable decisions about where to go, how to eat, and what to leave with. [halva with pistachios, macademias, almonds] I found myself in this delightful situation in Tunis. I’d been just enough times to know exactly what I wanted to eat (see here, here, and here for starts), where I wanted to visit, and I had designs to package up loads of good stuff to take home with me. Thankfully, my Most Gracious Hosts obliged, and we headed to a few food markets and stores to grab some of the best [read: most transportable] of what Tunisia has to offer. [harissa paste] There were fresh markets and fish markets, where enthusiasts… er… debated the virtues of the trade. …